Of games, gaming simulation and piracy in games

One of my fellow researchers shared the following game with me:

http://www.greenheartgames.com/app/game-dev-tycoon/

Game Dev Tycoon™ is a business simulation game available for Windows, Mac and Linux as well as on the Windows 8 Store. In Game Dev Tycoon you replay the history of the gaming industry by starting your own video game development company in the 80s. Create best selling games. Research new technologies and invent new game types. Become the leader of the market and gain worldwide fans.

He found it really interesting,

“What happens when pirates play a game development simulator and then go bankrupt because of piracy?”: http://www.greenheartgames.com/2013/04/29/what-happens-when-pirates-play-a-game-development-simulator-and-then-go-bankrupt-because-of-piracy/
They ran an experiment where they released a pirated version of the game and saw how people reacted when during the simulation they ran out of money – because of piracy!

Interesting, yes. But the limitation of such games is that it is a game, as against a simulation.  An example of this effect is; most tycoon games simplify external effects as the more it is a simulation the less fun it can be. The tycoon style game play is a very popular design for  management/financial games (A close cousin is “Diner Dash” or “Farm Frenzy” which sheds light on logistics and functional parts of an organisation). Consider this, if you have played The Sims, you can find a job by simply using a computer in less than 20 seconds. But one can make an entire game out of the context of finding a job (in effect simulating the entire experience). Would you still be interested in playing The Sims if it simulates all the frustrations you experienced while finding a job?

Game Dev Tycoon simplifies the issues surrounding piracy and how it can be tackled to a great extent. Often the high price for ‘good’ games makes it inaccessible to a large audience. Some reasons for a high price may be:

  1. The game was developed using unrealistic targets. (Example: Duke Nukem Forever, no pun intended 🙂 )
  2. Games developed in mainstream  studios  Vs Indie studios

Some innovators in the field tackle piracy in the following ways  (instead of  slapping on a restrictive DRM):

  1. FTP (Free To Play) models offer a glimpse of the game before asking us to pay. The payment is usually a continuous nominal subscription versus a one time payment. The jury is still out on this. Example: LOTRO, Dungeons and Dragons, host or other games. Premium content for the players (enhancing their game-play and/or in game status) are also offered by such games.
  2. Innovative DRM systems in marketplaces  such as Steam and Uplay instead of an always on system (Example: The latest SimCity).
  3.   A low/high priced game followed by high/low paid DLCs (Downloadable Content). Example: Skyrim,  The Sims (Some DLCs for The Sims 3 is more expensive than the base game!).

Currently in Steam,  the beta version of the game is available at a lower price. The players test the game as they play beta versions and then get access to the full version for free when it is released. A very interesting experiment in reducing costs in the game development process and using the “crowd” for both testing and funding.

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