Event Report – 12th Plan Hackathon, 6-7 April 2013

Students from M.S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology – Akhil Sukumaran, Anuj NK, Kunal V and Nandha Kumar, who are currently interning with Fields of View, participated in the 2-day Hackathon organised by the Planning Commission of India. They submitted an info-graphic about “Solid Waste Management in Urban India”, which is attached at the end of this post; and won the second place for visualisations in Bangalore. This is their report of the event.

 

The Planning Commission of India in association with Data Portal India organised the Hackathon, a two day event conducted in select centres across the country. The Hackathon was an event created to hack the 12th Five-Year Plan (2012-2017), through competitions in three categories: Short films, Visualizations and Applications in one of seven sectors of the plan which consisted of:

  • Macroeconomic Framework
  • Agriculture and Rural Development
  • Health
  • Water and Environment
  • Energy
  • Education and Skill Development
  • Urban Development

The aim was to represent the issues(s) in a sector and convey what the 12th Plan recommends on these issues.  We, the team of four from MSRIT, had the opportunity to contest in the Visualization category in the event conducted at IISc, Bangalore. The topic we chose for our visualization was ‘Solid Waste Management in Urban India’ in the Urban Development sector of the plan. We focused on key issues such as waste processing in India, allocation of funds for scientific treatment and disposal and also compared certain parameters in waste management in six tiers of cities classified based on population.

 

The next segment of the info-graphic consisted of the recommendations of the 12th Plan for Urban Solid Waste Management which included: The 4 R’s i.e. Reduce, Re-use, Recycle and Re-manufacture; enhancing re-cycling facilities for E-waste; incentivizing Private Public Partnership (PPP) in hazardous waste management and also emphasized on segregation of waste at source and its effective disposal.

— Akhil Sukumaran, Anuj NK, Kunal V, Nandha Kumar and Prateek S

 

Click on the below image to view the full info-graphic. This work is licensed under Creative Commons CC BY-SA 3.0 License.

Solid Waste Management in Urban India

 

Certificates of Appreciation

Nandha Kunal Anuj Akhil

Feminism and Me – Introductory Note on the Series

A friend of mine, Vinay, told me the other day that I might be a fake Mallu or a fake Gult, but I am a true blue Feminist. For people who work and live with me, being a feminist is one of my primary identities. Most people have come to know, perhaps a little painfully, that I don’t let things go, especially when it comes to gender, sexism, patriarchy, harassment etc.  I can be the quintessential rabid feminist, and most of the time, I am proud of it. A lot of people have asked and will continue to ask of feminists: why are we so angry? My friend, Priyanka, said it best: Because we have reason to be.

 

An often-quoted fact about feminism that gets a lot of publicity, but very little understanding is that feminism as an ideology and practice is very diverse. We can have radical feminists, liberal feminists, ecofeminists, third-world feminists – we come in all shapes and sizes, and it is difficult to say that there is one feminism, and one type of feminist. People often state it, but rarely examine the implications of it. The most obvious consequence of this form of diversity is that if we take a bunch of feminists together, and put them in a room – we will hate abortion, we don’t mind abortion, we want to ban prostitution, we think prostitution should be made legal, we think porn is exploitative, we think porn can be made for women, we hate capital punishment, we want rapists to be hung . . . and it can go on and on. We are a lot of things, and we believe in a lot of things. And one of the most common things that we believe in is that we ought to have our own opinions on what feminism means to us. For us, one of the fundamental tenets of feminist thought is – we define it, we recreate it, we make meaning of it in our own lives. All of us who identify as feminist define, learn, re-learn, understand, disagree, grapple with the overarching principles, ideologies, and the grand narratives of feminism, and we use this engagement to examine the world around us.

 

So, this series – Feminism and me – is really about my personal and professional journey of what feminism means to me. It will be my attempt to articulate why I identify with feminism, not just as an ideology, but also as a lens, as a methodology, as a tool to understand social life, social problems, and the social world. In doing so, I want to be clear that I cannot speak for feminism, or feminists in general. I can only speak of my experiences with feminist thought, action, pedagogy, and methodology. So, this series will be primarily about my experiences as a feminist in social research.

A brief note on Serious Games for Training

Games have a vast history and have been an integral part of societies for a long time. All around the world, games are a popular means of recreation. Games exist in various forms; board games, sports, table top games, etc. With the advent of computers, another form of games, virtual games, are now used widely. The non-confrontational, yet realistic environs of gaming provide for a space where multiple ideas can co-exist, participants can learn from each other, experiment the consequences of their actions and learn from it. These, along with the immense popularity and appeal of gaming have been leveraged to help in training and education.

 

Clark Abt, in his seminal work, Serious Games (1970) defines them as games that have an “educational purpose and not intended to be played primarily for amusement”. However, using games for training is not something new. Serious games have been used for a while in the field of warfare to explore, plan, test and train military strategies and operations. War-gaming as it has been referred to in published literature has provided an ideal test bed for gaming methods as an exploration space. There are multiple other instances of serious games being used to train personnel:

  1. Institutions like Dubai Police, Lockheed Martin, ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems use the CryTek 3 Game engine to develop serious games for training.
  2. OLIVE (Online Interactive Virtual Environment) by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), has been used to develop multiple virtual games for training.
  3. Supervisor is a simulation built in close cooperation by Shell and Delft University of Technology. It is a serious game in which the player plays the role of a supervisor on a drilling site and is expected to handle hazardous situations, watch over personnel and take care of health safety and environment requirements.
  4. The e-adventure game engine has been used to develop various check list based training games.
  5. SafeWork SA is South Australia’s occupational health, safety and welfare (OHS) agency. They use both virtual games and table top exercises to train and educate students.
  6. Virtual Reality Technologies develop virtual reality based training to train coal miners.
  7. 3DiTeams is a first-person, multi-player virtual game developed by Virtual Heroes in collaboration with Duke University Medical Center. It is used for medical education and team training.

Players tend to experiment and explore more  in a game environment. Often, not following safety procedures and protocols results a very costly error, in the form of loss to human life, monetary losses and environmental losses. In a game, the players experience such losses in a realistic manner, thus sensitising them to the consequences of their actions, however small. Here are some examples where serious gaming based training has improved the adherence to protocols, performance and decision making capabilities of personnel:

  1. The Rosser Top Gun Laparoscopic Skills and Suturing Program, or Top Gun, is a training program for surgical residents in laparoscopy. Surgeons who played video games in excess of 3 hours per week showed 37% fewer errors and 27% faster completion, thus indicating a clear correlation between video game skill and surgical skill.
  2. The Office of Naval Research and Raytheon BBN Technologies have collaborated with University of Southern California to test, evaluate, and provide quantified research findings about the effectiveness of game-based training.  Damage Control Trainer (DCT), a 3D first-person game was tested with the US Navy recruits in November, 2008. Decision making errors were reduced by 50%, communication errors were reduced by up to 80%, and situational awareness and navigation skills were improved by 50%.
  3. Mining accidents are a common phenomenon and have for long been using virtual environments to train people in safety procedures. On an average ten haul truck accidents lead to fatalities, a virtual training environment was designed to investigate and train the drivers. After training, the control group had only drivers making non-fatal errors. Filigenzi et al. describe the results from the training simulation in this paper.

At Fields of View, we are working on designing and developing games for awareness, training, and planning. You can read more about how we use games here, and more about our games and the various other projects here.